NEW! TPG Launches Virtual Presentation Training Service

January 2017
For immediate release
Contact: info@thepincusgroup.com • 301.938.6990

TPG Launches Virtual Presentation Training Service 

Expanded Access to Personal Coaching Now Available 

Washington, DC – The Pincus Group is making its personalized presentation coaching available on line for the first time. “We’ve been seeing increasing demand for wider access to our personalized presentation coaching” said Aileen Pincus, TPG President. “We wanted to respond and make sure anyone who needs high quality presentation coaching can get it, affordably and at their own convenience.”

TPG’s new On Demand Virtual Coaching will include: a personalized one hour virtual coaching session with a senior level TPG presentation coach, a separate review of content/materials of choice with suggestions on improvement, best practice tips and techniques to help with any presentation, and a follow up, tailored written report to help trainees stay on track after coaching. Virtual coaching clients will also receive a discount voucher to use for any in-personal training session scheduled within the same year.

Presentation coaching sessions can include any format including impromptu, with materials or without, formal or informal remarks or speeches, testimony training, team or panel presentation training and are scheduled on a first come/first served basis.

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TPG CEO featured in Huffington Post article

Tell-It-Like-It-Is Trump Becomes Teleprompter Donald

The GOP nominee is now using the machine he used to scorn, except really badly.

S.V. Date Senior Political Correspondent, The Huffington Post

WASHINGTON ― Donald Trump has become what he has long mocked.

After a full year ridiculing his rival candidates for relying on a teleprompter and finding himself on a shorter leash from his new handlers, the Republican presidential nominee has fully embraced the tool. There is, of course, one key difference: He is bad at it.

“If you’re just going to be staring at a monitor and shouting and gesticulating, then what’s the point?” wondered Aileen Pincus, a public speaking consultant and teleprompter coach based in Washington. “It’s painful.”

Trump’s staff has for months realized that his tendency to wander off topic or unleash personal insults made any effort to deliver a serious address risky. So Trump has, beginning with his speech to a pro-Israel lobbying group in March, resorted to a teleprompter to get through important speeches.

But although the machine was designed to help public speakers appear more natural and maintain eye contact with their audience, it appears to have the opposite effect on Trump.

During his acceptance speech at the Cleveland Republican convention, Trump squinted for much of the address. In his Aug. 15 speech about terrorism, he appeared at times to get confused about what he was reading, leading to awkward pauses and sentences that trailed off. And on Wednesday night’s much-touted speech on immigration, Trump seemed fixated on the lefthand screen for long stretches.

On occasion, Trump also has misread words, sometimes to embarrassing effect. On Aug. 24 in Tampa, he said Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton had created a private email server “deliberately, willfully and with pre-medication,” before correcting himself: “premeditation.” And on Wednesday, Trump read “amnesty” – a key trigger word among his hardcore, anti-immigration base – as “amnety.”

Pincus said Trump’s problems with the machine are common for beginners. “It’s not unusual at all,” she said. “What’s unusual is that this man is the Republican nominee for president.”

Trump’s campaign did not respond to The Huffington Post’s queries about how much training the candidate has received on the device. One Republican consultant close to the campaign acknowledged that Trump could use some help, but isn’t particularly interested. “He resists all attempts to change, train, educate, generally,” said the consultant, speaking anonymously because he didn’t want to anger the nominee.

Trump’s resistance to the machine appears tied to his overarching concern to be entertaining and never boring, at all costs. He has said numerous times over his campaign that he could be “presidential” if he wanted to, but his audience wouldn’t like it.

He repeated that thought on Laura Ingraham’s radio show Thursday. Ingraham, who supports Trump, asked him why, at his Phoenix rally Wednesday night, he didn’t use the low-key tone that he had used in his remarks earlier in the day in Mexico after meeting with President Enrique Peña Nieto. “We had this unbelievably energized crowd,” Trump replied. “And if I would’ve used the tone that I used in Mexico, I think everybody would’ve fallen asleep.”

The new reliance on the machine ― which uses transparent screens on either side of the lectern that display the script ― began with Trump’s installing Kellyanne Conway as his third campaign manager in as many months. Top Republicans urged Trump to tone down his public persona and keep to a strict set of messages on immigration, trade and attacks against Clinton, using a teleprompter to stay focused.

The switch, though, comes after 13 months of mocking other candidates for using one.

On Aug. 14, 2015, Trump told a Hampton, New Hampshire, audience: “If you’re running for president, you should not be allowed to use a teleprompter,” and then rotated from side to side to mimic someone reading from one screen and then the other. “You shouldn’t be allowed, because you don’t know what you’re going to get. Look what happened with Obama, where he’s a teleprompter guy.”

On Oct. 10, in Norcross, Georgia, Trump told his crowd: “I’ve always said, if you run for president, you shouldn’t be allowed to use teleprompters,” to big applause. “Because you don’t even know if the guy’s smart.”

As late as July 6 in Cincinnati, Trump mocked Clinton for using the device in her speeches. He stared at an imaginary screen to the left: “North and south,” then turned to his right, “or east and west,” and then turned to the left again: “Donald Trump is a bad person.”

In his mockery, however, Trump resembled mainly himself.

“There is something truly unique in his delivery and affect in his teleprompter speech, and I don’t mean that as a compliment,” said Rick Wilson, a Florida GOP consultant and a longtime Trump critic. “Some of it is his raging ADD. He’s trying to race ahead of his message and do some ‘acting.’ It’s clumsy and weird. And for people who aren’t for Trump, it’s incredibly off-putting.”

Pincus, the speech trainer, said Trump could easily get some professional help. A two-to-three hour session with her firm would cost a few thousand dollars – considerably less than an hour’s worth of jet fuel consumed by Trump’s personal 757 airliner.

“I doubt it’s the money that’s holding him back,” she said, but hastened to add that she personally had no interest in volunteering her services. “I’m quite sure there are plenty of other people who can help him.”

Training Contract Awarded for FDIC

September 9, 2016
For immediate release
Contact: (301) 938-6990                    

Training Contract Awarded for FDIC

Pincus Group Awarded multi-year contract for FDIC Executives

(Washington DC)—The Pincus Group was awarded a 4-year contract with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) beginning in 2016. TPG will be offering ongoing training to FDIC executives in presentation and briefing skills,  and available to FDIC personnel nationwide.

The communication skills training will be conducted by The Pincus Group, a media training and crisis communications executive training firm in Silver Spring, Maryland and led by TPG President Aileen Pincus and TPG VP and Senior Trainer David Burnett.

“We’re thrilled to be working with FDIC’s outstanding personnel and are gearing up for this new, extended commitment with them,” Aileen Pincus said. “The agency has a track record of commitment to personnel development and we couldn’t be more pleased to be a part of that.”      

The multiple day trainings will be scheduled on an on-going basis at FDIC’s Arlington Headquarters beginning in the Fall of 2016.

The Pincus Group provides executive coaching for public and private sector clients around the world in media, speech, presentation and crisis communications. For more information contact info@thepincusgroup.com or visit our website at www.thepincusgroup.com

 

 

TPG to Provide Tennessee Valley Authority Media Training

For immediate release
Contact: Stephanie Lockwood • slockwood@thepincusgroup.com • 301.938.6990

Washington, DC – The Tennessee Valley Authority, a corporation owned by the U.S. government and providing electricity for 9 million people in parts of seven southeastern states, has awarded a contract to the Pincus Group for media training, communications training and consulting. TPG in partnership with Zayas Hendrick MediaWorks LLC, will provide training for designated TVA personnel to prepare them for a variety of public communications.

“We’re very much looking forward to working with TVA’s executives and managers” said Aileen Pincus, TPG President “and we’re especially gratified to work with our partners at Zayas Hendrick on this tailored program to benefit TVA’s media and public communications.”

Zayas Hendrick MediaWorks is a leading Washington DC firm providing video production, instructional design and training.

The TVA, which was established in 1933 by an act of Congress, is a self-sustaining corporation and receives no taxpayer funds. Its mission is to help lead the Tennessee Valley region and the nation toward a cleaner and more secure energy future, relying more on nuclear power and energy efficiency and relying less on coal.

TPG provides world-class media training, crisis communications, speech and presentation coaching for public and private sector executives in the US, Europe and throughout the Middle East. For more information contact info@thepincusgroup.com or visit our website at www.thepincusgroup.com

TPG Signs Global Health Leader For Executive Training

For immediate release
Contact: Stephanie Lockwood • slockwood@thepincusgroup.com • 301.938.6990

Washington, DC- Washington DC – Management Sciences for Health, a global health non-profit organization working in over 150 countries, has signed a long-term agreement with the Pincus Group for communications training and consulting.

The Pincus Group will provide training for MSH executives working in the US and around the world from offices in Arlington, Virginia and MSH’s world headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “We’re very excited about building a continuing relationship with MSH, and helping to support their important work around the world,” said Aileen Pincus, TPG President.

MSH has been a leader in global health, particularly in areas of maternal, new born and child health, for over 40 years. TPG provides world-class media training, crisis communications, speech and presentation coaching for public and private sector executives in the US and globally.

TPG provides world-class media training, crisis communications, speech and presentation coaching for public and private sector executives in the US, Europe and throughout the Middle East. For more information contact info@thepincusgroup.com or visit our website at www.thepincusgroup.com